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Fair housing is the law of the land.

The Fair Housing Council is here to ensure that all who seek housing have an equal opportunity to rent, purchase, finance and insure the property that they choose. Fair housing means that you may freely choose a place to live without facing discrimination because of your race, color, religion, gender, national origin or disability or because you have children. It is your right to be treated in an equal and non-discriminatory manner.

Victim to Victor

The Story of Fair Housing Council NJ Executive Director, Lee Porter

Mrs. Lee Porter is affectionately known as the “Mother of Fair Housing”. In 1965, Lee Porter and her husband were initially denied housing in Bergen County, prompting her to volunteer for the Fair Housing Council of Bergen County. Lee moved up the ranks to eventually hold the executive directorship in 1971, a position she still holds to this day. 

Mrs. Porter was born in Brooklyn, one of four children. Her family and faith instilled in her the importance of helping others. Lee Porter became involved in civil rights at age 14, when she joined the Catholic Interracial Council in New York. While raising her children, the bespectacled, soft-spoken mother of three dedicated herself to helping others through scores of organizations, including the Girl Scouts, the League of Women Voters, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Courtesy of northjersey.com/Amy Newman

Recent articles from The Good Neighbor

The latest news, updates, information, and resources from The Fair Housing Council of Northern New Jersey..

The Fair Housing Act

Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, commonly referred to as the Fair Housing Act, was passed on April 11, 1968. The legislation was pending in Congress for several years when the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. motivated Congress to approve enact the law seven days after his death.